IES Disagrees With AMA on Night Time Outdoor Lighting

Last year the AMA issued Policy H-135.927 Human and Environmental Effects of Light Emitting Diode (LED) Community Lighting, which recommended, among other things, that LED outdoor lighting should have a CCT of 3000 K or below.  The AMA made this recommendation thinking that lower correlated color temperatures contain less blue light, which can disrupt circadian rhythms.

Today the IES issued a Position Statement disputing that recommendation, noting that CCT

is inadequate for the purpose of evaluating possible health outcomes; and that the recommendations target only one component of light exposure (spectral composition) of what are well known and established multi-variable inputs to light dosing that affect sleep disruption, including the quantity of light at the retina of the eye and the duration of exposure to that light. A more widely accepted input to the circadian system associated with higher risk for sleep disruption and associated health concerns is increased melanopic content, which is significantly different than CCT. LED light sources can vary widely in their melanopic content for any given CCT; 3000 K LED light sources could have higher relative melanopic content than 2800 K incandescent lighting or 4000 K LED light sources, for example.

Follow the link to read the entire Position Statement.  Blue light hazard, light’s impact on circadian rhythms and overall health, and related topics are a hot area of research.  We’re learning more all the time, but we don’t yet know enough to apply circadian lighting to every situation.  Outdoor and street lighting are among the areas where research is not yet conclusive.

IES Symposium Summary

If you missed IES Research Symposium III Light + Color you missed an exciting (for color geeks) few days. It would take too long to relate everything that was discussed, but here are some key highlights.

  • TM-30-15 is seeing broader acceptance throughout the industry. In an exciting development, it seems that the CIE is going to endorse TM-30 Rf after a few changes are made. The expectation is that the industry will then begin a rapid movement toward using Rf instead of CRI Ra, and that eventually CRI will be withdrawn. Unfortunately, the CIE is notoriously slow, so there is no timeline for their formal endorsement of TM-30. Maybe next year?
  • Manufacturers are resolving the spectral deficiencies that result from using a limited number of LEDs in both color mixing and color temperature tuning products. Their solution is to move from two and three color systems to systems using four or five independently controlled colors of LEDs.
  • Color preference was a big topic with no resolution. One complaint of both CRI and TM-30 is that they penalize light sources that deviate from the reference source even if many people prefer the deviation. Of course, Ra and Rf are both fidelity metrics, so they must penalize such deviations.   We have strong evidence that people prefer light sources that slightly increase the saturation of objects, and that people prefer light sources that include somewhat more red than the reference sources. However, because the amount of deviation that is preferred is application dependent, a single, all-purpose metric for rating color preference seems to be unattainable.